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Does anyone here know if there exists something similar to the Grace Hopper celebration, but for EE's?
Hey there guys! I hope this is allowed, and since I didn't see anything against it, I'm going to assume it is, haha, feel free to get rid of it if I'm wrong. My name is Bee, and I'm a third year Canadian electrical engineering student. I recently came to the conclusion that maybe it would drive my friends a little bit less insane if I didn't talk to them about school all the time, so I started recording my adventures through engineering in a blog.

I've found it incredibly helpful to have somewhere to reflect on what's happening with my education, and I hope that maybe someone can learn something from my experiences. If not, maybe my trials will at least amuse you a little bit, haha. And if anyone else has a similar blog, I'd be really interested! Most of the blogs I've found written by students are med-school centric, and I think it would be great to get more engineering information out there, so let me know!

If you're interested, I've included the link behind the cut to be just a little bit less of a spam monster :)Collapse )

Tags:

I got this through a women-in-engineering list that I'm on, figured I'd pass it along in case anybody here was interested.

MPH Entertainment is casting the pilot for a reality show about female science & engineering students. They want people who "have a multi-faceted life beyond the books."

Natural Convection Around a Heated Box?

Does anyone have (or have any sources for) hand calculations to determine the cooling of a heated box in natural convection?

We have thermal software, but want to be able to do ball park hand calculations to ensure that our software is not off in the weeds. We have a small aluminum box, in free air, heated internally. We are interested in the steady state skin temperature of the box.

Right now the thought is to combine 6 plate analyses as an approximation, but I wasn't sure if there was a more specific model we could use.

Any thoughts?

Thanks in advance!

X-posted to engineers

Engineers/Scientists @ Work on TV

I'm pretty sure the first "hard-core scientific" TV show I watched as a kid was Star Trek: The Next Generation (although I admit Bill Nye the Science Guy, 321 Contact, and Quincy made some appearances, too). Most of the science on TNG was on the abstract level, and almost "magical," even (transporters, anyone?), but I think shows like the Star Trek franchise certainly led people to consider the possibility of pursuing a career in a scientific field. (On another note: the "science of Star Trek" book(s) out there...worth reading, yes/no?)


So, in light of waxing nostalgic about TV days of yore, I thought I'd try to compile a list of...

Shows currently on the air (or clinging onto dear sweet life) with scientists (and OMG engineers!) in a work-like setting



- Defying Gravity (mystery/drama about astronauts...there are a few aerospace engineers on the show...is this *really* the only current show that has "engineer-as-an official-job-title" in it?****)
cut b/c list turned out WAY longer than I thought it would...science is ALL over the place on TV, and rightly so ;-)Collapse )


Any other "engineers/scientists at work" shows out there? (I haven't watched Eureka in forever and a day, maybe I should add it to the above list, y/n? Primeval? I haven't really watched much of Heroes or Lost, either, so I don't know how much "work" stuff they get into....) And, if anyone has any non-English language suggestions to add to the list (currently or formerly on the air, even), speak up! I have *no* problem watching stuff with subtitles.

****ETA: Wait, I forgot about Medium...Joe is an engineer, isn't he? And Grant on Mythbusters certainly counts as well (I think he has a degree in EE?). Ok, people, point out the female engineers I may be missing on TV!!!!! I am drawing a blank, but am not overly surprised I am drawing said blank, since I don't think there are any out there on TV at the moment, if ever???? :-( :-( D-: (And as far as currently depicting diversity in a scientific work setting goes...Defying Gravity pretty much wins on this count, IMO. Stargate Universe *may* rival it, but as I haven't seen it yet, can't say too much about it at the moment. I am blanking out on Virtuality's cast/character set-ups...I've only caught part of the show's pilot episode...they may be in the running, too, although it may be a moot point now.)

x-posted to engineers and my journal
How do you feel about the statements/data presented in the following abstract? (my thoughts are behind the cut at the end of this entry)

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Journal of Personality and Social Psychology
2009 Volume 96, Issue 6 (Jun)

http://psycnet.apa.org/journals/psp/96/6/
http://psycnet.apa.org/index.cfm?fa=search.displayRecord&uid=2009-07435-001

Interacting with sexist men triggers social identity threat among female engineers.
By Logel, Christine; Walton, Gregory M.; Spencer, Steven J.; Iserman, Emma C.; von Hippel, William; Bell, Amy E.
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. Vol 96(6), Jun 2009, 1089-1103.

Abstract
[Correction Notice: An erratum for this article was reported in Vol 97(4) of Journal of Personality and Social Psychology (see record 2009-16971-002). The affiliation for William von Hippel is incorrect. The affiliation should have been University of Queensland.] Social identity threat is the notion that one of a person’s many social identities may be at risk of being devalued in a particular context (C. M. Steele, S. J. Spencer, & J. Aronson, 2002). The authors suggest that in domains in which women are already negatively stereotyped, interacting with a sexist man can trigger social identity threat, undermining women’s performance. In Study 1, male engineering students who scored highly on a subtle measure of sexism behaved in a dominant and sexually interested way toward an ostensible female classmate. In Studies 2 and 3, female engineering students who interacted with such sexist men, or with confederates trained to behave in the same way, performed worse on an engineering test than did women who interacted with nonsexist men. Study 4 replicated this finding and showed that women’s underperformance did not extend to an English test, an area in which women are not negatively stereotyped. Study 5 showed that interacting with sexist men leads women to suppress concerns about gender stereotypes, an established mechanism of stereotype threat. Discussion addresses implications for social identity threat and for women’s performance in school and at work. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved)
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My thoughts about this abstract....Collapse )


Sound off below!

Project Management Survey

Dear Colleagues,

Would you be willing to participate in the survey about the role of personality in a project team? I am conducting the survey as a part of the research thesis “Discovering Intertype Relations in a Project Team” for New York University. The study is interested to find out the correlation between personality type and how different personality types influence each other while working together in a project team. Participants must be willing to answer an online questionnaire which consists of two parts: the first part of the questionnaire measures your personality type, and the second part reveals your communication choices. It will take approximately 20 minutes to complete the survey.

If you are interested in participating in the survey, upon completion of the research you will receive a summary report and a brief profile of your personality type.

If you are interested and willing to volunteer, but have questions please contact me by email address listed below, otherwise you can access the survey at
http://www.surveymonkey.com/s.aspx?sm=OWlLnklfDAoWRwu0L2XHkQ_3d_3d

Thank you for your consideration of this request.

email: nvk214@nyu.edu
Link to the survey: http://www.surveymonkey.com/s.aspx?sm=OWlLnklfDAoWRwu0L2XHkQ_3d_3d

Sep. 10th, 2009

Name: Olga
Location: Virginia Beach area, VA
School: Old Dominion University
Degrees Obtained: bachelor
Major(s): Computer Science
Favorite class/subject/engineering interest: love math, cryptography, software classes.
Employment status: Asst. of business director (my current job is not related to my major :( )
Short-term and/or long-term education/professional goals: find a summer 2010 internship (preferably in Washington, DC area), finish my degree, get master degree from GWU in CS (with computer security and information assurance area of focus), find a job
What would you like to get out of joining this community? meet new people who have the same interests

Total Stations?

Does anyone have an opinion, or opinions, about reflectorless total stations?

Which is the most user friendly?
Which is best in all sorts of weather?

I simultaneously love and hate shopping for new things.

Background-I have a Topcon 225.  I need a reflectorless TS to repeatedly shoot a crane (eq mounted GPS is out as it is a rental machine, robotic is out due to price).  Mounting prisms to machine is possible, but visibility is poor due to continuous movement/prisms being out of sight/blocked. 

I need to line the equipment up over 400+/- points in the field.  I will also need a data collector with idiot proof software so I can input data beforehand.  I didn't have this with my Topcon, as everything had to be manually inputted into the TS itself.

I will have my Topcon with me, as a backup, so if the data collector was compatible, that would be awesome.

My budget is $7000 or less.

Can anyone help?
x posted

The Male Programmer Checklist

From this link and generally applicable to all engineering fields.

Do these ring true for you? Some more than others?

Personally, there are lots of things on this list that make me nod my head. And really, I find it very saddening. I mean, I love the guys I work with--they are generally kind hearted well meaning guys. And yet, it's still a struggle. So what does that say for the women who work with the real pigs? It's depressing.

Which leads to the real questions: "What can we do to change these? How much time does it take? Will my generation ever see that day?"


Being male, as a programmer, means:
Not having to wonder whether you're well-known in your community simply for being "the female one".
The freedom to do your job without anyone insinuating that you only got hired because of affirmative action, or because of the anatomy you happen to possess.
Joining in appreciation of the sex object du jour without having to be gay or bisexual.
Having your desk near the entrance to your office without visitors assuming you're the receptionist.
Telling someone to RTFM without being accused of PMS.
The freedom to make mistakes or say stupid things without worrying about it getting added to the pile of "why women suck at computer stuff".
Attending a technical talk without people assuming that you're only there because your boyfriend dragged you along with him.
Not having to explain why the term "gentlemen" doesn't include you.
Listening to speakers refer to an inanimate software construct as "this guy" without getting distracted.
Having colleagues who close the door when they talk to you.
Not having to think about what gender you are.
Having potential romantic partners assume from your career that you're smart and well-to-do rather than unattractive and unfeeling.
Not being the special case ("hi guys and girls, I guess, too, if you want to get really technical about it!!")
If you're married, having people take you to lunch without them speculating on how your spouse would feel about them taking you to lunch.
Getting invited to play video games with people, because they haven't assumed you won't be interested because of your gender.
Having interests that are stereotypical for your gender without having to worry you'll be taken less seriously because of it.
Having interests that are unstereotypical for your gender and getting seen as cool and progressive rather than freaky and asexual for it.
Being treated like a hero if you compromise on work for childcare responsibilities, rather than having your commitment to work questioned.
Not having to choose between dressing/acting stereotypically for your gender and being thought unprofessional (or not a Real Geek) for it, and dressing/acting un-stereotypically and being thought unseemly.
Never being described as a "hot guy" first and a competent professional second. (example)
Laughing at jokes like this because women holding bumper stickers about closures is funny in the same way pictures of cats "reading" calculus books is funny, rather than wondering whether your colleagues see you in the same way as those women.
The freedom to watch a technical talk without being explicitly reminded that many of your colleagues see you primarily as a sex object.
The freedom to switch to a less technical career without feeling like you're betraying the cause of gender equality.
Walking home unafraid after a late-night coding spree.
The freedom to listen to speakers say that software should be so easy to use that even your mom could use it without wondering whether they have you in mind.
The freedom to listen to speakers say that instant messaging isn't just for teenage girls talking about the Backstreet Boys without wondering whether they have you-ten-years-ago in mind.
The freedom to listen to speakers use gender fields in database schemata as an example of an attribute that never changes and only has two possible values without having to sit on your hands.
Enjoying the blissful illusion that computer science or the IT industry are pure meritocracies where gender never matters.
The freedom to discuss the role of gender in programming without people thinking you're being (a) self-serving, (b) whiny, (c) bringing politics into realms where it's not relevant, or (d) all of the above.
The privilege of being able to deny the existence of your own privilege as a male programmer.